Toughest Interview Question: Answered

Category: Career, Jobs 32 1

Answers for toughest Interview questions

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Confident, experienced job candidates aren’t intimidated by difficult interview questions: They welcome them as challenges to conquer. Professionals never know when they’ll sit down with an interviewer who relishes putting applicants on the hot seat, so it’s best to prepare for any contingency.

There are questions that employers commonly ask at job interviews and it’s important to be prepared to respond to those interview questions. You don’t need to memorize an answer, but do think about what you’re going to say, so you’re not put on the spot during the job interview. To offer guidance on dealing with incredibly to such tough questions during a job interview we have a few frequently asked interview questions which may guide you.

1)      Tell me about yourself.

Most interviewers use this question not only to gather information, but also to assess your poise, style of delivery and communication ability. People tend to meander through their whole resumes and mention personal or irrelevant information in answering–a serious no-no. Keep your answer to a minute or two at most. Cover four topics: early years, education, work history, and recent career experience. Emphasize this last subject. Remember that this is likely to be a warm-up question. Better yet, prepare a personal branding statement that quickly describes who you are and what you can bring to the company.

2)      What is your biggest weakness?

Realize that most interviewers don’t expect you to be perfect or reveal your true weaknesses. Turn this question around and present a personal weakness as a professional strength. Let’s assume that you’re detail-oriented, a workaholic and that you neglect friends and family when working on important projects. You can turn these weaknesses around by saying that you’re very meticulous and remain involved in projects until you’ve ironed out all the problems, even if it means working after hours or on the weekend.

3)      What is your biggest strength?

Briefly summarize your work experience and your strongest qualities and achievements that are directly related to the responsibilities of the job you are applying for. One proven approach is to include four specific skills that employers value highly: self-motivation, initiative, the ability to work in a team and a willingness to work long hours.

4)      Describe a difficult work situation/ project and how you over came it?

A question like this gives your potential employer a sense of your work ethic, your goals, and your overall personality. In your answer, you should be cognizant of the type of job you’re applying for. Whereas a large corporation might place all their emphasis on the bottom line, a non-profit would measure success not in money but in social impact. Do your research before the interview: browse the company’s website, research their presence in the news and media, and see if you can find any information about their mission statement. Here’s how to research a company.

5)      How do you evaluate success?

Give concrete examples of difficult situations that actually happened at work. Then discuss what you did to solve the problem. Keep your answers positive and be specific. Itemize what you did and how you did it. The best way to prepare for questions where you will need to recall events and actions is to refresh your memory and consider some special situations you have dealt with or projects you have worked on. You can use them to help frame responses. Prepare stories that illustrate times when you have successfully solved a difficult situation.

6)      Why are you leaving this job or have left previous job?

The economy has pushed many talented professionals into the workforce, so don’t be ashamed to simply explain that you were a part of a downsizing. If you were fired for performance issues, it’s best to merely say you “parted ways” and refocus the discussion on how your skill set matches the current position. If you’re transitioning to a new industry, discuss why you’re making the transition and tie it into the new job responsibilities.

7)      Why should we/I hire you?

The most overlooked question is also the one most candidates are unprepared to answer. This is often because job applicants don’t do their homework on the position. Your job is to illustrate why you are the most qualified candidate. Review the job description and qualifications very closely to identify the skills and knowledge that are critical to the position, then identify experiences from your past that demonstrate those skills and knowledge.

8)      What didn’t you like about your last job?

Beware over sharing or making disparaging comments about former co-workers or supervisors, as you might be burning bridges. But an additional trouble point in answering this query is showing yourself to be someone who can’??t vocalize their problems as they arise. Why didn’t you correct the issue at the time? Be prepared with an answer that doesn’t criticize a colleague or paint you in an unflattering light.

9)      Where do you see yourself in three to five years?

The worst answer you can provide to this one, is “I have no idea,” even though that might be the truth. Try a response like “I’ve done a lot of self-assessment, and what I’ve learned about myself is that I want to make a commitment to this career and I want to build my career here.” This question is often asked of recent college graduates, and the worst answer is to say that you want to be president of the company or have the interviewer’s position. Instead, talk about what motivates you especially what will motivate you on this job and what you hope to have accomplished.

10)   What is the biggest risk you have ever taken?

Some roles require a high degree of tenacity and the ability to pick oneself up after getting knocked down. Providing examples of your willingness to take risks shows both your ability to fail and rebound, but also your ability to make risky or controversial moves that succeed.

11)   What can you tell me about our company or industry?

Do your homework. Check out the company website and their “About Us” section. Most public companies post Investor Information which typically lists their Management Team, Board of Directors and past financial performance. Write down a few key points that you can cite when asked. Interviewers want to know that you’re interested in more than just a job.

12)   Do you have any questions? Can you think of anything else you’d like to add?

Don’t say “no,” or that everything has been thoroughly discussed. If you think the interviewer has any doubts, now’s the time to restate why you’re the most logical candidate for the opening. Show your interest in the company by preparing some key questions in advance. Asking about corporate culture or what the interviewer likes the best about the company will give you insight and let the interviewers know that you’re interviewing them as well.

Though these questions are just for your guidance so do refer them but don’t cram them. Hope these questions answered do help you. GOOD LUCK for the Interview.

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